THE FISH-EATING ANEMONE

Fish-eating anemones are commonly found on rocks from the low intertidal zone to approximately 160 feet 48.8 meters deep and in the cool waters of the eastern Pacific Ocean, from Alaska to La Jolla California.

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Fish-eating anemone (Urticina piscivora) is related to coral and jellies. Fish-eating anemones are typically found in the cool waters of the eastern Pacific Ocean attached to rocks or pilings.

Their genus name Urticina derives from Latin word for a stinging plant called a nettle the species name Piscivora means fish eating.

These animals have an orange or red column topped by an oral disc surrounded by many tentacles armed with stinging cells called nematocysts.

Its mouth is in the center of the oral disc at the opposite end of the column is its sticky foot, which they can use to move around.

Fish-eating anemones are commonly found on rocks from the low intertidal zone to approximately 160 feet 48.8 meters deep and in the cool waters of the eastern Pacific Ocean, from Alaska to La Jolla California.

This species feeds on shrimp other invertebrates and small fishes it captures with its tentacles, are coiled threads containing venom and has a barbed end.

When prey brushes against tentacles nematocysts shoot out, killing or immobilizing the prey.

Tentacles then pass the food into its digestive cavity through the mouth. Undigested food and waste are released through their mouth.

This species can reproduce asexually by spitting either vertically or horizontally.

They may also reproduce by spawning eggs or sperm into water where it fertilized they will develop into planktonic planula larvae eventually metamorphosing into an anemone.

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